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By Ben Amunwa, Law mostly, 6 May 2016
The law should not punish children for the sins of their parents. If anything it should shield them from the consequences, wherever possible. But if the children belong to a 'foreign criminal', as defined by the UK's deportation regime, 'punish away' seems to be the gist of a...
By Matrix Legal Support Service, UK Supreme Court Blog, 5 May 2016
R (O) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2016] UKSC 19, on appeal from: [2014] EWCA Civ 990: The Supreme Court unanimously dismissed the appeal concerning the appellant's challenge to her continued detention in Immigration Removal Centres which had resulted in her poor mental health...
By Sheila Hayman, Freedom from Torture, 25 April 2016
I’m on a packed Piccadilly Line train in rush hour. I’m going to provide moral support to a former member of the Write to Life Group, at her asylum appeal hearing at the First Tier Immigration Tribunal - somewhere near Heathrow Airport. The TfL website gave me four different options...
By Ben Amunwa via The Justice Gap, 20 April 2016
Torture is universally held in open contempt by the UK legal system. Except, of course, in national security cases, where the evidence of UK complicity in torture overseas may be kept secret, as the High Court case of Kamoka & Ors v The Security Service & Ors [2016] EWHC 769 (QB) reveals....
By Ben Amunwa, Law mostly, 14 April 2016
Where a foreign national is convicted of an offence and sentenced to at least 4 years imprisonment, the government must make a deportation order against them. If that person then appeals against the deportation order on the grounds that the decision breaches their rights to family and private life...
By Bernard Ryan via The Conversation, 11 April 2016
The European Union’s response to the migration crisis that began in 2015 has had two distinct phases. While there was initial support for humanitarian solutions to the increasing number of people claiming asylum, hope for a primarily humanitarian approach has long since evaporated. The...
By Sir Rabinder Singh, 15 March 2016
University of Nottingham Human Rights Law Centre Annual Lecture 2016 Making Judgments on Human Rights Issues Sir Rabinder Singh 1. It is a great pleasure to return to the University of Nottingham, especially as I have such fond memories of being a junior lecturer here, more years ago than I now...
By Heaven Crawley via The Conversation, 7 March 2016
After no fewer than five emergency summits, a solution to Europe’s refugee crisis remains elusive. The list of failures is long and growing including the failure to deliver “hotspots”, reception centres meant to process refugees who arrive in frontline states such as Italy and...
By Matthew Hill, UK Human Rights Blog, 15 February 2016
Samia Wasif and another v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2016] EWCA Civ 82 What is the difference between a case that is "totally without merit" and one that is "not arguable"? Are either of those more or less hopeless than a case that is "bound to fail...
By Jo Wilding via The Conversation, 3 February 2016
In recent days, accounts have emerged of asylum seekers in Middlesborough being targeted for abuse because of distinctive red doors on their accommodation, while a plan to have them wear red wristbands was hurriedly scrapped in Cardiff. Clearly, asylum seekers in the UK are still too often deeply...
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About the guest blog

EIN's guest blog is intended as a platform where we gather together some of the best of immigration law blogging. And it is a platform where you can post your opinions, commentary or analysis on immigration and asylum law.

If you're a seasoned blogger, of if you've always wanted to blog but never found an audience, blogging on EIN is a way of ensuring your opinions are available to read on a leading immigration law website.

EIN encourages your blog submissions.

You can send your submissions to us at support@ein.org.uk.

Please include a title for your piece, and please also let us know the name that you wish to appear as the author of the post. This may simply be your full name, but we appreciate that some may wish to post anonymously or under a pseudonym.

Blog submissions should ideally be on the theme of immigration or asylum law, but we're happy to receive submissions on more general immigration topics.



Disclaimer

The EIN guest blog is provided for information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. EIN does not necessarily endorse any of the views expressed by guest bloggers in this section, nor their company, products or services.