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By Ben Amunwa, Law mostly, 14 April 2016
Where a foreign national is convicted of an offence and sentenced to at least 4 years imprisonment, the government must make a deportation order against them. If that person then appeals against the deportation order on the grounds that the decision breaches their rights to family and private life...
By Bernard Ryan via The Conversation, 11 April 2016
The European Union’s response to the migration crisis that began in 2015 has had two distinct phases. While there was initial support for humanitarian solutions to the increasing number of people claiming asylum, hope for a primarily humanitarian approach has long since evaporated. The...
By Sir Rabinder Singh, 15 March 2016
University of Nottingham Human Rights Law Centre Annual Lecture 2016 Making Judgments on Human Rights Issues Sir Rabinder Singh 1. It is a great pleasure to return to the University of Nottingham, especially as I have such fond memories of being a junior lecturer here, more years ago than I now...
By Heaven Crawley via The Conversation, 7 March 2016
After no fewer than five emergency summits, a solution to Europe’s refugee crisis remains elusive. The list of failures is long and growing including the failure to deliver “hotspots”, reception centres meant to process refugees who arrive in frontline states such as Italy and...
By Matthew Hill, UK Human Rights Blog, 15 February 2016
Samia Wasif and another v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2016] EWCA Civ 82 What is the difference between a case that is "totally without merit" and one that is "not arguable"? Are either of those more or less hopeless than a case that is "bound to fail...
By Jo Wilding via The Conversation, 3 February 2016
In recent days, accounts have emerged of asylum seekers in Middlesborough being targeted for abuse because of distinctive red doors on their accommodation, while a plan to have them wear red wristbands was hurriedly scrapped in Cardiff. Clearly, asylum seekers in the UK are still too often deeply...
By Paola Pace and Kristi Severance, Forced Migration Review, 13 January 2016
Failure to employ correct terminology has consequences beyond semantics. More efforts are needed to educate people – especially those whose words are widely disseminated – in the correct use of migration-related terminology. From the January 2016 Forced Migration ReviewCurrent...
By Matthew Donmall, UK Human Rights Blog, 6 January 2016
Two recent Court of Appeal cases, heard together, have considered the legality of the immigration detention of those who are, or possibly are, minors. Such cases involve local authority age assessments, which are to be carried out according to the guidance set out in Merton [2003] EWHC 1689 (Admin...
By Francois Crepeau and Francisco Carrión Mena, UN OHCHR, 17 December 2015
Equality and non-discrimination are the basis of States’ human rights obligations. By upholding these principles, Governments acknowledge that human rights are for all, and that migrants should be treated as equal rights holders. Migrants, have - among other things - the right to health,...
By Alina Müller, Migrants' Rights Network, 7 December 2015
During the Commons debate on the Immigration Bill last week, MPs opposing it made strong appeals to the government's sense of compassion, justice and fair-play. The government remained emphatically unmoved. For anyone following the debate on the Immigration Bill 2015-2016 since its...
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About the guest blog

EIN's guest blog is intended as a platform where we gather together some of the best of immigration law blogging. And it is a platform where you can post your opinions, commentary or analysis on immigration and asylum law.

If you're a seasoned blogger, of if you've always wanted to blog but never found an audience, blogging on EIN is a way of ensuring your opinions are available to read on a leading immigration law website.

EIN encourages your blog submissions.

You can send your submissions to us at support@ein.org.uk.

Please include a title for your piece, and please also let us know the name that you wish to appear as the author of the post. This may simply be your full name, but we appreciate that some may wish to post anonymously or under a pseudonym.

Blog submissions should ideally be on the theme of immigration or asylum law, but we're happy to receive submissions on more general immigration topics.



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The EIN guest blog is provided for information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. EIN does not necessarily endorse any of the views expressed by guest bloggers in this section, nor their company, products or services.