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By Lord Dyson, Master of the Rolls, 9 November 2015
LORD DYSON MR THE GLOBALISATION OF LAW PILGRIM FATHERS LECTURE 2015 6 NOVEMBER 2015 (1) Introduction [1] 1. It is a great pleasure to have been asked to give the Pilgrim Fathers Lecture, particularly in a year so rich in anniversaries. This is a most prestigious annual lecture. The previous...
By Sean O'Beirne, UK Supreme Court Blog, 5 November 2015
The Supreme Court considered whether the Secretary of State had acted unlawfully in refusing an application without following her published guidance. Background Mr Mandalia applied to extend his student visa on 7 February 2012. The rules in effect at the time required him to submit a bank...
By Darren Stevenson, McGill & Co, 28 October 2015
The case of Basnet v SSHD is now nearly 4 years old. I know this well, since I represented the appellant, Mr Basnet, at the Upper Tribunal in Edinburgh just a week before the birth of my daughter, who is now almost 4. Since then it is fair to say that a lot has changed. The case of Basnet was...
By Nazmun Ismail, 15 October 2015
Mandalia v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2015] UKSC 59 The issue of evidential flexibility in immigration cases has been the subject of intense debate and controversy since the Government was given permission to appeal out of time by the Court of Appeal against the decision of the...
By John Kelly, EIN, 9 October 2015
The Immigration Bill 2015-16 arrived on September 17th (PDF here, HTML from here and explanatory notes here). The Bill's own summary says: "A Bill to make provision about the law on immigration and asylum; to make provision about access to services, facilities, licences and work by...
By Joanna Wilding, University of Brighton via The Conversation, 28 September 2015
As the refugee crisis continues to dominate headlines around the world, local authorities in Britain are in dispute with the government over the funding they receive for the care of unaccompanied children seeking asylum. They have understandable concerns – rules designed to protect children...
By Nearly Legal, 21 September 2015
Following hard on the heels of J's excellent post on the Immigration Bill, we now have further discussion of the EU right to reside rules by the CJEU in Jobcenter Berlin Neukolln v Alimanovic Case C-67/14 (to which I might say, good luck landlords). To say that the EU right to reside rules are...
By Nick Gill, Rebecca Rotter, Andrew Burridge, Melanie Griffiths and Jennifer Allsopp, 8 September 2015
From the September 2015 issue of Forced Migration Review: New research findings indicate that factors such as the gender of the judge and of the appellant, and where the appellant lives, are influencing asylum appeal adjudication. There is a widespread, and growing, expectation that no matter...
By Nils Muižnieks, 20 August 2015
Those who think that irregular migrants have no rights because they have no papers are wrong. Everyone is a holder of human rights regardless of their status. It is easy to understand that the prohibition of torture protects all people but we should also be aware of the fact that basic social...
By Awale Olad, Migrants' Rights Network, 19 August 2015
Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Prisons (HMIP) launched a scathing attack on the government's detention policy and focused specifically on the plight of pregnant women detained in Yarl's Wood. The Inspector said that Yarl's Wood immigration removal centre was 'a place of national concern' with the...
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About the guest blog

EIN's guest blog is intended as a platform where we gather together some of the best of immigration law blogging. And it is a platform where you can post your opinions, commentary or analysis on immigration and asylum law.

If you're a seasoned blogger, of if you've always wanted to blog but never found an audience, blogging on EIN is a way of ensuring your opinions are available to read on a leading immigration law website.

EIN encourages your blog submissions.

You can send your submissions to us at support@ein.org.uk.

Please include a title for your piece, and please also let us know the name that you wish to appear as the author of the post. This may simply be your full name, but we appreciate that some may wish to post anonymously or under a pseudonym.

Blog submissions should ideally be on the theme of immigration or asylum law, but we're happy to receive submissions on more general immigration topics.



Disclaimer

The EIN guest blog is provided for information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. EIN does not necessarily endorse any of the views expressed by guest bloggers in this section, nor their company, products or services.