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By Landmark Chambers, 4 May 2017
The Court of Appeal has, today, dismissed an appeal which sought to challenge the continued application of rule 353 of the Immigration Rules to further human rights submissions. In R (Robinson) v SSHD [2017] EWCA Civ 316, the Appellant argued that amendments made in the Immigration Act 2014 to the...
By Christopher Bertram, Devyani Prabhat & Helena Wray, openDemocracy, 2 May 2017
The UK Supreme Court has accepted the principle of a minimum income requirement for bringing family members into Britain, but hope remains for British families split by borders. For thousands of British citizens and residents separated from loved ones by immigration rules, headlines after the...
By Sarah Jane Ewart, UK Human Rights Blog, 24 April 2017
The Facts: NE-A, a Nigerian national, has been resident in the UK since 2006. He was convicted of aggravated burglary and sentenced to six years imprisonment. Evidence was given in the First Tier Tribunal that he suffers from a schizoaffective disorder, and would relapse if deprived of his current...
By Amaka Nnamani, Augustus Chambers, 10 April 2017
The judgment in Paposhvili v Belgium - 41738/10 (Judgment (Merits and Just Satisfaction): Court (Grand Chamber) [2016] ECHR 1113 was handed down on 13 December 2016. It is likely that the significance and impact of the principles which arguably underpin the decision, will take some time to digest....
By Danielle Cohen, 6 April 2017
The Free Movement of Persons Directive 2004/38 sets out the rights of EEA nationals and their family members to move and reside freely within the territory of an EEA member state. Self-Sufficient Persons One of the categories of a qualified person under the Regulations are those who are self-...
By Doughty Street Chambers, 31 March 2017
The Court of Appeal has ruled that the Home Secretary is required to refer judges hearing asylum and immigration appeals to relevant country information and guidance which may assist the appellant, regardless of whether she has already published it on the Internet. Mark Henderson, instructed by...
By Ben Amunwa, Law mostly, 27 March 2017
Senior judges have found (yet again) that children can be punished for the sins of their parents, giving a green-light to the Home Office to remove families from the UK (even if they have not committed any crime). The case of AM (Pakistan) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2017] EWCA...
By Samantha Knights, UK Supreme Court Blog, 13 March 2017
This long-awaited judgment, and one of a number in recent months from the Supreme Court in relation to family and private life protection, concerns the fundamental question of the relationship between the Immigration Rules and ECHR, art 8. In particular, at issue was whether the July 2012 changes...
By Ben Amunwa, Law mostly, 28 February 2017
For families divided by Home Office income requirements, the latest case on the human right to family life offers mixed results. While the main challenge to the Rules failed, parts of the policy were heavily criticised. This case (MM (Lebanon) & Ors v Secretary of State and another [2017] UKSC...
By Melissa Darnbrough and Nadia Hussain, openDemocracy, 27 February 2017
Families in the UK that open their doors to child relatives fleeing the camps of Calais are being penalised by stringent rules on legal aid. It was a cold winter day last year and the small waiting room at Greater Manchester Immigration Aid Unit is cramped as usual with clients waiting to be seen...
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About the guest blog

EIN's guest blog is intended as a platform where we gather together some of the best of immigration law blogging. And it is a platform where you can post your opinions, commentary or analysis on immigration and asylum law.

If you're a seasoned blogger, of if you've always wanted to blog but never found an audience, blogging on EIN is a way of ensuring your opinions are available to read on a leading immigration law website.

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Please include a title for your piece, and please also let us know the name that you wish to appear as the author of the post. This may simply be your full name, but we appreciate that some may wish to post anonymously or under a pseudonym.

Blog submissions should ideally be on the theme of immigration or asylum law, but we're happy to receive submissions on more general immigration topics.



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